diamond geezer

 Thursday, January 31, 2013

From tomorrow morning the observation decks at the tallest building in Europe will open to the public. You'll be able to take the lift to the 68th floor and peer down over London, weather permitting, and all for only £24.95.

Over the last month hundreds of journalists and bloggers have been given the chance to go up to the top for free, and take lots of photos, and then write about the experience for publicity. Last weekend it was the turn of Southwark residents, 4500 of whom snapped up free tickets and enjoyed seeing their borough from a new angle.

So I was delighted to be offered the opportunity to visit the Shard myself, and to take a look inside, in advance of the official opening. Here's a report of my visit, and maybe it'll encourage you to take the trip too.


View from the Shard

To gain access to the Shard's toppermost floors, you don't head to the obvious ground level doors. Instead you head one level down, following a series of makeshift portable signs to the gloomy passage below. Look for the tall portal in the arches opposite the florist, in a location where otherwise you'd not choose to linger. A pair of electronic information boards have been erected this week, one on either side of the doors. These have information about the day's ticket availability in half hourly slots, and are currently coloured red throughout because the sightseeing decks aren't open yet. Below is a list of ticket prices, where anyone who's not booked in advance is in for a shock. The turn-up-and-go admission price is £100, pitched gobsmackingly high in the hope that rich wealthy foreign visitors will swan along and pay anyway. How glad was I to be gaining admittance to the building for free?

From here let's take the scenic escalator to the next floor up. This is a spacious ride, with clear views into the main lobby on St Thomas Street where a considerable amount of fitting-out has yet to be completed. Visitors are gaining access to The Shard in advance of corporate clients, which can't be bad. At the top of the ascent keep right, rather than taking the direct route onwards to the new bus station. This'll be a most convenient connection when it's fully unveiled, but it's not ready yet. At this point you pass the Shard's main entrance, where suited security guards waited patiently (in front of and behind the revolving doors) to direct mere members of the public elsewhere. Best shuffle by.

From here it's only a few steps to the main concourse at London Bridge station. A brand new circulation space has opened as part of ongoing redevelopment work, with a long row of ticket barriers at the far end beyond a central void. Along one side is a row of seats, entirely insufficient for expected numbers of waiting passengers. And beyond that is the foot of the Shard, its slanting glass walls slicing down to intersect the concourse at ground level. Raise your eyes and you can see the upper floors rising to a lofty point beyond the suspended roof. It's time at last to step inside the first of four interior spaces.



This tour of the Shard begins at Caffè Nero Express - a tiny outlet, barely more than a counter and some shelves. There's nowhere to sit down, indeed half a dozen customers queuing on the chequerboard tiles could bring the place to a halt. But buy a coffee here, beyond the glass façade, and you've just stepped inside London's newest iconic building. There's a similar buzz nextdoor at Upper Crust - Baguette Specialist. This tiny space could be filled by two travellers and a suitcase, but nevertheless lies entirely within the Shard's perimeter. Here stuffed bread products are lined up beneath an ad for tom yum chicken, while a vintage clock ticks silently on a white-painted artificial brick wall. The excitement continues at the next retail outlet, slightly further back, part-hidden behind a pillar. From here the smell of baked pastry wafts across the station concourse courtesy of the West Cornwall Pasty Company. Wave £4.49 across the divide and a "pasty and hot drink" combination could be yours. But this is a very small concession, barely two metres in depth, so only the staff behind the counter can truly claim to be inside the Shard.

After these three minor incursions, it's the final gateway which is the true highlight of this special tour. Located at the far end, by the ticket barriers, only now does the visitor enters the true belly of the beast. This portal stretches back back back, past two concessions selling croissants and coffee to a discerning audience. Here at last is breadth, and depth, and a WHSmith which fills the Shard's southern corner. Won't you look at that view? The glories of London and the City are splashed across the covers of various current affairs magazines, the people so tiny, especially from the other side of the shelves.

But that's nothing compared to the glories ahead. An entire branch of Marks and Spencer Simply Food has opened deep inside the exterior of the Shard, and it's stacked from wall to wall with goodies. Bouquets have been laid out at the entrance by a group of expert flower arrangers, creating a majestic display to welcome you inside. Also in a priority location by the door are biscuits, racks of them, for commuters who can't go four hours without gulping down a traybake. And then the floor splits into three parallel aisles, one with a lot of sandwiches, one with a lot of fruit, and one with an abundance of wine. It's a magical space, where once you've entered you can linger for as long as you choose, and maybe even take away a souvenir of your visit.

If the weather's bad, never fear, that needn't make a difference. A long row of electronic devices are arrayed along an inner wall, allowing virtual transactional contact with the outside world. Smartly dressed staff will assist you to scan and pay, as your time within this great building draws to a close. But take time to stand and stare one last time, looking back past the French bread specialists to the ticket gates and the station beyond. See commuters waiting for a platform announcement, see tourists slurping on a latte. See the entire world bustling by, see London in microcosm. That's the View From The Shard, that is.

I've been. Will you?


<< click for Newer posts

click for Older Posts >>


click to return to the main page


...or read more in my monthly archives
Jan14  Feb14  Mar14  Apr14  May14  Jun14  Jul14  Aug14
Jan13  Feb13  Mar13  Apr13  May13  Jun13  Jul13  Aug13  Sep13  Oct13  Nov13  Dec13
Jan12  Feb12  Mar12  Apr12  May12  Jun12  Jul12  Aug12  Sep12  Oct12  Nov12  Dec12
Jan11  Feb11  Mar11  Apr11  May11  Jun11  Jul11  Aug11  Sep11  Oct11  Nov11  Dec11
Jan10  Feb10  Mar10  Apr10  May10  Jun10  Jul10  Aug10  Sep10  Oct10  Nov10  Dec10 
Jan09  Feb09  Mar09  Apr09  May09  Jun09  Jul09  Aug09  Sep09  Oct09  Nov09  Dec09
Jan08  Feb08  Mar08  Apr08  May08  Jun08  Jul08  Aug08  Sep08  Oct08  Nov08  Dec08
Jan07  Feb07  Mar07  Apr07  May07  Jun07  Jul07  Aug07  Sep07  Oct07  Nov07  Dec07
Jan06  Feb06  Mar06  Apr06  May06  Jun06  Jul06  Aug06  Sep06  Oct06  Nov06  Dec06
Jan05  Feb05  Mar05  Apr05  May05  Jun05  Jul05  Aug05  Sep05  Oct05  Nov05  Dec05
Jan04  Feb04  Mar04  Apr04  May04  Jun04  Jul04  Aug04  Sep04  Oct04  Nov04  Dec04
Jan03  Feb03  Mar03  Apr03  May03  Jun03  Jul03  Aug03  Sep03  Oct03  Nov03  Dec03
 Jan02  Feb02  Mar02  Apr02  May02  Jun02  Jul02 Aug02  Sep02  Oct02  Nov02  Dec02 

eXTReMe Tracker
jack of diamonds
life viewed from london e3

email    twitter    G+

my flickr photostream

twenty blogs
853
arseblog
ian visits
londonist
scaryduck
blue witch
the great wen
onionbagblog
edith's streets
spitalfields life
linkmachinego
tired of london
in the aquarium
round the island
christopher fowler
thamesfacingeast
one bus at a time
ruth's coastal walk
london reconnections
uk general election 2015

read the archive
Aug14  Jul14  Jun14  May14
Apr14  Mar14  Feb14  Jan14
Dec13  Nov13  Oct13  Sep13
Aug13  Jul13  Jun13  May13
Apr13  Mar13  Feb13  Jan13
Dec12  Nov12  Oct12  Sep12
Aug12  Jul12  Jun12  May12
Apr12  Mar12  Feb12  Jan12
Dec11  Nov11  Oct11  Sep11
Aug11  Jul11  Jun11  May11
Apr11  Mar11  Feb11  Jan11
Dec10  Nov10  Oct10  Sep10
Aug10  Jul10  Jun10  May10
Apr10  Mar10  Feb10  Jan10
Dec09  Nov09  Oct09  Sep09
Aug09  Jul09  Jun09  May09
Apr09  Mar09  Feb09  Jan09
Dec08  Nov08  Oct08  Sep08
Aug08  Jul08  Jun08  May08
Apr08  Mar08  Feb08  Jan08
Dec07  Nov07  Oct07  Sep07
Aug07  Jul07  Jun07  May07
Apr07  Mar07  Feb07  Jan07
Dec06  Nov06  Oct06  Sep06
Aug06  Jul06  Jun06  May06
Apr06  Mar06  Feb06  Jan06
Dec05  Nov05  Oct05  Sep05
Aug05  Jul05  Jun05  May05
Apr05  Mar05  Feb05  Jan05
Dec04  Nov04  Oct04  Sep04
Aug04  Jul04  Jun04  May04
Apr04  Mar04  Feb04  Jan04
Dec03  Nov03  Oct03  Sep03
Aug03  Jul03  Jun03  May03
Apr03  Mar03  Feb03  Jan03
Dec02  Nov02  Oct02  Sep02
back to main page

diamond geezer 2013 index
diamond geezer 2012 index
diamond geezer 2011 index
diamond geezer 2010 index
diamond geezer 2009 index
diamond geezer 2008 index
diamond geezer 2007 index
diamond geezer 2006 index
diamond geezer 2005 index
diamond geezer 2004 index
diamond geezer 2003 index
diamond geezer 2002 index

my special London features
a-z of london museums
E3 - local history month
greenwich meridian (N)
greenwich meridian (S)
the real eastenders
london's lost rivers
olympic park 2007
great british roads
oranges & lemons
random boroughs
bow road station
high street 2012
river westbourne
trafalgar square
capital numbers
east london line
lea valley walk
olympics 2005
regent's canal
square routes
silver jubilee
cube routes
metro-land
capital ring
river fleet
piccadilly
bakerloo

ten of my favourite posts
the seven ages of blog
my new Z470xi mobile
five equations of blog
the dome of doom
chemical attraction
quality & risk
london 2102
single life
boredom
april fool

ten sets of lovely photos
my "most interesting" photos
london 2012 olympic zone
harris and the hebrides
betjeman's metro-land
marking the meridian
tracing the river fleet
london's lost rivers
inside the gherkin
seven sisters
iceland

just surfed in?
here's where to find...
diamond geezers
flash mob #1  #2  #3  #4
ben schott's miscellany
london underground
watch with mother
cigarette warnings
digital time delay
wheelie suitcases
war of the worlds
transit of venus
top of the pops
old buckenham
ladybird books
acorn antiques
digital watches
outer hebrides
olympics 2012
school dinners
pet shop boys
west wycombe
bletchley park
george orwell
big breakfast
clapton pond
san francisco
thunderbirds
routemaster
children's tv
east enders
trunk roads
amsterdam
little britain
credit cards
jury service
big brother
jubilee line
number 1s
titan arum
typewriters
doctor who
coronation
comments
blue peter
matchgirls
hurricanes
buzzwords
brookside
monopoly
peter pan
starbucks
feng shui
leap year
manbags
penelope
bbc three
vision on
piccadilly
meridian
concorde
wembley
islington
ID cards
bedtime
freeview
beckton
blogads
eclipses
letraset
arsenal
sitcoms
gherkin
calories
everest
muffins
sudoku
camilla
london
ceefax
robbie
becks
dome
BBC2
paris
lotto
118
itv